find resources:
Measles Outbreak


LOS ANGELES – Given widespread outbreaks in the United States and internationally, and locally-acquired cases, the chance of exposure to measles is increased at this time. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) is investigating a number of reports of measles in Los Angeles County residents (excluding Long Beach and Pasadena as any cases identified in those cities are reported by their local health departments).

These include a local outbreak of four confirmed measles cases linked to one another after international travel and an additional single case of measles after international travel. Public Health urges residents who have not been fully immunized against measles with two doses of the measles immunization, to contact their healthcare provider to get fully immunized in order to better protect their individual health and to prevent the spread of measles to others.


The following locations have been currently identified as potential measles exposures:

-Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Tom Bradley International Terminal, arrived at Gate 218 on April 1 from 6:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

-University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), Franz Hall on April 2, 4, and 9 and Boelter Hall on April 2 and 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 6 :00 p.m.

-California State University, Los Angeles, Main Library, on April 11 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

-El Pollo Loco Restaurant, 1939 Verdugo Blvd, La Cañada Flintridge, on April 11 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

-El Sauz Tacos, 4432 San Fernando Rd, Glendale, on April 13 from 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

There is no known current risk related to measles that exists at any of these venues at this time.

Press Release PDFEnglish | Español

 

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome M. Adams, M.D., M.P.H., released a new video, “The Doctor Is In,” on the topic of  vaccinations. As the Nation’s doctor, VADM Adams wants to share the message that vaccines are safe and effective ways to protect your children, your family, your neighbors, and yourself.

 

Common symptoms of measles include fever, cough, runny nose, conjunctivitis (red eyes) and a rash which usually appears 10 to 21 days after the exposure. Individuals should contact their healthcare provider by phone before going in if they develop measles symptoms, so measures can be taken to prevent possible spread to others in the provider’s waiting room. They should also tell their doctor or other healthcare provider if they traveled internationally or had international visitors in the last 21 days or had exposure to another person with measles. It is highly contagious and anyone who is not vaccinated against the virus can get it at any age.

Although measles is rare in the United States because of high vaccination rates, it is still common in other parts of the world. Measles is common in some countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa and is occasionally brought into the Unites States by unvaccinated travelers who return with measles infection.

measles infographic

Vaccines are available at healthcare providers, local pharmacy or health clinic. Public Health clinics offer no or low-cost immunizations for individuals who are uninsured or underinsured.

To find a nearby Public Health clinic, call 2-1-1 or visit this link.

Measles can cause these signs of disease:
-High Fever (over 101°F)
-Cough
-Runny nose
-Red watery eyes
-A rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body

Persons with measles are contagious from 4 days before until 4 days after the rash appears. The incubation period for developing measles is up to 21 days after being exposed to someone else who has the disease.

Measles is spread through a cough or sneeze by a person with measles and can still infect others 2 hours after the infected person has left a room. 

Public Health Working for You
In response to the measles cases that have occurred in Los Angeles County, Public Health has mounted effective public health strategies to control the spread of this disease, including

1. Identifying contacts and protecting them with active or passive immunization when possible, as well as limiting their activities when necessary to prevent possible spread to others;
2. Isolating people who are infectious to prevent the spread of measles to others;
3. Strongly advising not immunized individuals to receive the measles immunization; and
4. Notifying the public through postings and local media of specific public locations where measles cases have occurred

No current events